Die 7 besten Bitcoin Mining Software 2020 (Mac, Windows ...

Running Two GPUs- This is a tricky one.

Hello!
I'm trying to get a (remarkably unorthodox) multi-GPU setup working with my system. In short, I'm trying to pair an Nvidia GTX 1050ti and a Quadra FX580 on the same Windows 10 system. My motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-A320M-S2H.
The 1050ti is installed in the PCiE x16 slot, and the Quadro FX580 is installed in one of the PCiE 1x slots via a 1x -> 16x riser card(typically used by bitcoin miners). Windows 10 recognizes both devices in the device manager. Yes, I understand the bottlenecks, warnings, and otherwise ridiculous nature of this setup, but I just needs it for additional monitor outputs. Buying a completely new 10-series GPU or new motherboard is out of the budget(already had the Quadro FX580 on hand), and USB-based video cards are too unreliable and underperforming for what we're after. This is what we've tried so far and the results we've gotten:
Here's where things get interesting.
Booting into Linux, both GPUs work with no issues, right off the bat.
Booting into Windows 10 safe mode and running DDU (followed by a reboot back into safe mode) enables both GPUs, and they both work. Which suggests that Windows 10 is definitely capable of operating in this configuration. However, attempting to install either driver for either card (or even just letting Windows do so on its own) breaks the FX580 and enables only the 1050 ti, giving a "Code 43" for the FX580 in device manager.
I'm completely perplexed. Drivers for the FX580 aren't important, as it's just for additional screen real estate, though being able to run the latest drivers for the 1050ti would be nice for best game performance. Is there a way to "lock" the working Microsoft Basics Display Driver to the FX580, keeping it in a working state and allowing the 1050ti to be updated? My friend did this successfully with his personal system with a 1080ti and an old ATI card and it was plug-and-play; both cards worked great and there were no driver issues, so I'm completely stumped as to why this configuration is giving me so much trouble(He is stumped on this problem as well)
Any insight or help would be greatly appreciated!
submitted by tuckjohn37 to techsupport [link] [comments]

Crypto Mining for Beginners. Is it really worth it?

Crypto Mining for Beginners. Is it really worth it?

Image from blokt.com
Mining cryptocoins is an arms race that rewards early adopters. You might have heard of Bitcoin, the first decentralized cryptocurrency that was released in early 2009. Similar digital currencies have crept into the worldwide market since then, including a spin-off from Bitcoin called Bitcoin Cash. You can get in on the cryptocurrency rush if you take the time to learn the basics properly.

Which Alt-Coins Should Be Mined?


Image from btcwarp.com
If you had started mining Bitcoins back in 2009, you could have earned thousands of dollars by now. At the same time, there are plenty of ways you could have lost money, too. Bitcoins are not a good choice for beginning miners who work on a small scale. The current up-front investment and maintenance costs, not to mention the sheer mathematical difficulty of the process, just doesn't make it profitable for consumer-level hardware. Now, Bitcoin mining is reserved for large-scale operations only.
Litecoins, Dogecoins, and Feathercoins, on the other hand, are three Scrypt-based cryptocurrencies that are the best cost-benefit for beginners.
Dogecoins and Feathercoins would yield slightly less profit with the same mining hardware but are becoming more popular daily. Peercoins, too, can also be a reasonably decent return on your investment of time and energy.
As more people join the cryptocoin rush, your choice could get more difficult to mine because more expensive hardware will be required to discover coins. You will be forced to either invest heavily if you want to stay mining that coin, or you will want to take your earnings and switch to an easier cryptocoin. Understanding the top 3 bitcoin mining methods is probably where you need to begin; this article focuses on mining "scrypt" coins.
Also, be sure you are in a country where bitcoins and bitcoin mining is legal.

Is It Worth It to Mine Cryptocoins?

As a hobby venture, yes, cryptocoin mining can generate a small income of perhaps a dollar or two per day. In particular, the digital currencies mentioned above are very accessible for regular people to mine, and a person can recoup $1000 in hardware costs in about 18-24 months.
As a second income, no, cryptocoin mining is not a reliable way to make substantial money for most people. The profit from mining cryptocoins only becomes significant when someone is willing to invest $3000-$5000 in up-front hardware costs, at which time you could potentially earn $50 per day or more.

Set Reosonable Expectations

If your objective is to earn substantial money as a second income, then you are better off purchasing cryptocoins with cash instead of mining them, and then tucking them away in the hopes that they will jump in value like gold or silver bullion. If your objective is to make a few digital bucks and spend them somehow, then you just might have a slow way to do that with mining.
Smart miners need to keep electricity costs to under $0.11 per kilowatt-hour; mining with 4 GPU video cards can net you around $8.00 to $10.00 per day (depending upon the cryptocurrency you choose), or around $250-$300 per month.
The two catches are:
1) The up-front investment in purchasing 4 ASIC processors or 4 AMD Radeon graphic processing units
2) The market value of cryptocoins
Now, there is a small chance that your chosen digital currency will jump in value alongside Bitcoin at some point. Then, possibly, you could find yourself sitting on thousands of dollars in cryptocoins. The emphasis here is on "small chance," with small meaning "slightly better than winning the lottery."
If you do decide to try cryptocoin mining, definitely do so as a hobby with a very small income return. Think of it as "gathering gold dust" instead of collecting actual gold nuggets. And always, always, do your research to avoid a scam currency.

How Cryptocoin Mining Works

Let's focus on mining scrypt coins, namely Litecoins, Dogecoins, or Feathercoins. The whole focus of mining is to accomplish three things:
- Provide bookkeeping services to the coin network. Mining is essentially 24/7 computer accounting called "verifying transactions."
- Get paid a small reward for your accounting services by receiving fractions of coins every couple of days.
- Keep your personal costs down, including electricity and hardware.

The Laundry List: What You Will Need to Mine Cryptocoins


https://preview.redd.it/gx65tcz0ncg31.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f99b79d0ff96fe7d529dc20d52964b46306fb070
You will need ten things to mine Litecoins, Dogecoins, and/or Feathercoins.
1) A free private database called a coin wallet. This is a password-protected container that stores your earnings and keeps a network-wide ledger of transactions.
2) A free mining software package, like this one from AMD, typically made up of cgminer and stratum.
3) A membership in an online mining pool, which is a community of miners who combine their computers to increase profitability and income stability.
4) Membership at an online currency exchange, where you can exchange your virtual coins for conventional cash, and vice versa.
5) A reliable full-time internet connection, ideally 2 megabits per second or faster speed.
6) A hardware setup location in your basement or other cool and air-conditioned space.
7) A desktop or custom-built computer designed for mining. Yes, you may use your current computer to start, but you won't be able to use the computer while the miner is running. A separate dedicated computer is ideal. Do not use a laptop, gaming console or handheld device to mine. These devices just are not effective enough to generate income.
8) An ATI graphics processing unit (GPU) or a specialized processing device called a mining ASIC chip. The cost will be anywhere from $90 used to $3000 new for each GPU or ASIC chip. The GPU or ASIC will be the workhorse of providing the accounting services and mining work.
10) A house fan to blow cool air across your mining computer. Mining generates substantial heat, and cooling the hardware is critical for your success.
11) You absolutely need a strong appetite of personal curiosity for reading and constant learning, as there are ongoing technology changes and new techniques for optimizing coin mining results. The most successful coin miners spend hours every week studying the best ways to adjust and improve their coin mining performance.

Original Blog Post: https://www.lifewire.com/cryptocoin-mining-for-beginners-2483064
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

such beginner shibe thread wow how to get coin

 how to shibecoin v rich in minutes much instruct so simple any doge can do 

START HERE

UPDATE 1/21/14: I'm not updating this guide anymore. Most of the steps should still work though. See the wiki or check the sidebar for updated instructions.
Before you do anything else, you need to get a wallet. Until there's a secure online wallet, this means you need to download the dogecoin client.
Now open the client you just downloaded. You'll be given a default address automatically, and it should connect to peers and start downloading the dogechain (aka blockchain in formal speak). You'll know because there will be a progress bar at the bottom and at the lower right there should be a signal strength icon (TODO: add screenshots).
If you've waited 2 or 3 minutes and nothing is happening, copy this:
maxconnections=100 addnode=95.85.29.144 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=146.185.181.114 addnode=188.165.19.28 addnode=166.78.155.36 addnode=doge.scryptpools.com addnode=doge.netcodepool.org addnode=doge.pool.webxass.de addnode=doge.cryptopool.it addnode=pool.testserverino.de addnode=doge.luckyminers.com addnode=doge.cryptovalley.com addnode=miner.coinedup.comdoge addnode=doge.cryptoculture.net addnode=dogepool.pw addnode=doge.gentoomen.org addnode=doge.cryptominer.net addnode=67.205.20.10 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=78.46.57.132 
And paste it into a new text file called dogecoin.conf, which you then place into the dogecoin app directory.
Now restart your qt client and the blockchain should start downloading in about 1-2 minutes.
Once it finished downloading, you're ready to send and receive Dogecoins!

GETTING COINS

Decide how you want to get Dogecoin. Your options are:
I'll go into detail about each of these. I'm currently writing this out. I'll make edits as I add sections. Suggestions are welcome.

MINING

Mining is how new dogecoins are created. If you're new to crypto currencies, read this. To mine (also called "digging"), a computer with a decent GPU (graphics card) is recommended. You can also mine with your CPU, but it's not as efficient.

GPU MINING

These instructions cover only Windows for now. To mine, you'll need to figure out what GPU you have. It'll be either AMD/ATI or Nvidia. The setup for both is approximately the same.

Step One: Choose a pool

There's a list of pools on the wiki. For now it doesn't really matter which one you choose. You can easily switch later.
NOTE: You can mine in two ways. Solo mining is where you mine by yourself. When you find a block you get all the reward. Pool mining is when you team up with other miners to work on the same block together. This makes it more likely that you'll find a block, but you won't get all of it, you'll have to split it up with others according to your share of the work. Pool mining is recommended because it gives you frequent payouts, because you find more blocks. The larger the pool you join, the more frequent the payouts, but the smaller the reward you get.
Over a long period of time the difference between pool and solo mining goes away, but if you solo mine it might be months before you get any coins.

Step two: Set up pool account

The pool you chose should have a getting started page. Read it and follow the instructions. Instructions vary but the general idea is:
When you're done with this, you'll need to know:

Step three: Download mining software

For best performance you'll need the right mining software.
Unzip the download anywhere you want.

Step four: Set up miner

Create a text file in the same folder as your miner application. Inside, put the command you'll be running (remove brackets).
For AMD it's cgminer.exe --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://: -u -p
For Nvidia it's cudaminer.exe -o stratum+tcp://: -O :
Substitute the right stuff in for the placeholders. Then on the next line of the text file type pause. This will let you see any errors that you get. Then save the file with any name you want, as long as the file extension is .bat. For example mine_serverName.bat.

Step five: Launch your miner

Just open the .bat file and a command line window should pop up, letting you know that the miner is starting. Once it starts, it should print out your hash rate.
If you now go to the pool website, the dashboard should start showing your hashrate. At first it'll be lower than what it says in the miner, but that's because the dashboard is taking a 5 minute average. It'll catch up soon enough.
NOTE: A normal hashrate is between 50 Kh/s up to even 1 Mh/s depending on your GPU.

You're now mining Dogecoins

That's it, nothing more to it.

CPU MINING

CPU mining isn't really recommended, because you'll be spending a lot on more on power than you'd make from mining Dogecoin. You could better spend that money on buying Dogecoin by trading. But if you have free electricity and want to try it out, check out this informative forum post.

Trading

Trading has been difficult so far, but Dogecoin just got added to a few new exchanges. If you don't have a giant mining rig, this is probably the best way to get 100k or more dogecoins at the moment. I'll write up a more complete guide, but for now check out these sites:

Faucets

Faucets are sites that give out free coins. Usually a site will give out somewhere between 1 and 100 Dogecoin. Every site has its own time limits, but usually you can only receive coins once every few hours, or in some cases, days. It's a great way to get started. All you do is copy your address from the receive section of your wallet and enter it on some faucet sites. Check out /dogecoinfaucets for more. If you go to each site on there you might end up with a couple hundred Dogecoin!

Begging

This method is pretty straightforward. Post your receiving address, and ask for some coins. Such poor shibe. The only catch is, don't do it here! Please go to /dogecoinbeg.

Tips

At the moment there are two tip bots:
Other redditors can give you Dogecoin by summoning the tip bot, something like this:
+dogetipbot 5 doge
This might happen if you make a good post, or someone just wants to give out some coins. Once you receive a tip you have to accept it in a few days or else it'll get returned. Do this by following the instructions on the message you receive in your inbox. You reply to the bot with "+accept". Commands go in the message body. Once you do that, the bot will create a tipping address for you, and you can use the links in the message you receive to see your info, withdraw coins to your dogecoin-qt wallet, see your history, and a bunch of other stuff.
As a bonus, so_doge_tip has a feature where you can get some Dogecoins to start with in exchange for how much karma you have. To do this, send the message "+redeem DOGE" to so_doge_tip. You'll need to create a tipping account if you don't have one.
If you want to create a tipping account without ever being tipped first, message either of the bots with "+register" and an address will be created for you.

CHANGELOG

  • 1/21/14 - Added note about this thread no longer being updated
  • 1/21/14 - Changed wallet links to official site
  • 12/27/13 - Added 1.3 wallet-qt links
  • 12/21/13 - Added new windows 1.2 wallet link
  • 12/20/13 - Fixed +redeem text
  • 12/18/13 - Added short blurb on trading.
  • 12/18/13 - Updated cudaminer to new version (cudaminer-2013-12-18.zip).
  • 12/18/13 - Fixed +redeem link
  • 12/18/13 - Updates dogecoin.conf, from here.
  • 12/17/13 - Linked to mining explanation.
  • 12/17/13 - Added link to CPU mining tutorial, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added links to tip commands, link to dogetipbot wiki.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about tip commands going in body, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added link to cgminer mirror, thanks to scubasteve812 and thanks to Bagrisham.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about removing brackets in response to this.
  • 12/15/13 - Fixed hash rate as per this comment, thanks lleti
  • 12/15/13 - Added info for all other ways of getting money, except for trading (placeholder for now)
  • 12/15/13 - Added windows GPU mining instructions 12/15/13 - Added wallet instructions, list of how to get money
submitted by lego-banana to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Looking to get into mining again and questions about multipools

I was a bitcoin miner back when it first came out using fancy ATI graphics cards. It has clearly come a long way since then and I have struggled to keep with all of the different kinds of ASICS that are out there. I am looking to get into mining again and looking for some advice from those who have used multipools:
Thank you /CryptoCurrency compadres!
EDIT: I can't spell multi-pools
submitted by IrrigandumLigno to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How To Mine Doge with Ubuntu 13.10. (Part 1, for AMD Graphics Cards)

I feel the community really needs a resource like this. Because if I had a Doge for every-time taught a newbie how to Mine on Ubuntu, I would be a very rich doge!
EDIT: Sorry if it looks funny, Reddit doesn't like the numbers I put in for some reason.
If you have Ubuntu you have likely not upgraded because you think you cant mine on 13.10, and while that has been true in the past, a few people have got it figured out. So feel free to upgrade. If you are not on Ubuntu, Seriously you should consider using it. Even if its just on an older desktop.
Alright, so lets get a few things clear, I am assuming that you just FRESHLY installed Ubuntu 13.10 x64 on your system. I am assuming that you have no drivers, and no miners. You will need at least a key board and a mouse. The guide will be done in several parts, this first part is for most AMD Graphics cards. If you have an Nvidia, or just want to mine with your CPU, please check back later for those guides!
When reading this guide, please remember that as I give you commands to type into the terminal, Anything between { and} must be included. Do not copy and paste the {}.
Lets get started, If you have not already done so, Install Ubuntu 13.10 64Bit From Here (http://www.ubuntu.com/index_asus.html)
*1. Lets start by making sure you are up to date. Open up the terminal and enter this:
{sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade} 
Let that run for a bit.
*2. Once that has finished we are going to download some applications we will need:
{sudo apt-get install dh-make dh-modaliases execstack libxrandr2 libice6 libsm6 libfontconfig1 libxi6 libxcursor1 libgl1-mesa-glx libxinerama1 libqtgui4} 
*3. Once that has run its course we are going to install the ssh server. Remember this command is going to make your computer shut down. While it is shut down, carefully install your graphics cards. If you don't have any experience with this, I suggest you 3 minutes to watch this guide, because failure to install a graphics card the right way can destroy it.
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9x097QRXeA)
{sudo apt-get install openssh-server sudo shutdown now} 
*4.Install your Card(s) and turn the computer back on.
*5. Make a new folder called "AMD DRIVERS123" inside of your download folder. Downoad the following 3 things into that folder. (1. AMD Drivers: http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/incomplete) (2. AMD APP SDK: http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/heterogeneous-computing/amd-accelerated-parallel-processing-app-sdk/downloads/) (3. AMD ADL SDK:http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/graphics-development/display-library-adl-sdk/)
*6. Ok, now we need to unzip and compile those drivers. So, open a terminal my right clicking inside of "AMD DRIVERS123". The enter this:
{unzip amd-catalyst*.zip chmod +x amd-catalyst*.run} {sudo ./amd-catalyst*.run --buildpkg Ubuntu/saucy} 
*7. Now we need to install the drivers. Enter the code exactly as you see it, don't worry, the first command will fail, we are expecting it too.
{sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo apt-get -f install} {sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo reboot} 
Your computer should now reboot.
(If this failed, you probibly need to remove the old drivers. Do this
{cd /etc/default sudo pico grub} 
Change the line:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset" 
Now save by pressing [CTRL+x]
{sudo update-grub} this will make the change perminent. {sudo reboot -n} Reboot with new settings. Once it starts back up try installing the new drivers again.) 
*8.GREAT! You are really on a roll! Now we need to update AtiConfig
{sudo aticonfig --initial --adapter=all} 
*9.Time to install the APP ADK:
{tar xvf AMD-APP-SDK*.tgz} {sudo ./Install-AMD-APP.sh} {sudo reboot} 
*10. WOOT! You are so close to diggin that sweet Doge!! Its time to download CGMiner. IMPORTANT NOTE! You need to get CGminer 3.7, IT IS THE ONLY ONE THAT WILL WORK. Do not get any older or newer, Just this. :
{sudo apt-get install git unzip git clone -b 3.7 https://github.com/ckolivas/cgminer} 
*11. Ok, now go back to "AMD DRIVERS123", Unzip AMD SDL SDK 6.0. Once you have it unzipped, go the file called "include", open it up, copy everything inside, then go find CGminer. Copy these files into the CGminer file called ADL_SDK.
*12. To install CGminer, we are going to need a few things. Get all of these.
{sudo apt-get install build-essential autoconf libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev pkg-config libudev-dev} 
*13. Lets go ahead and compile CGminer.
{cd cgminer} {./autogen.sh} 
*14. Ok, when you did that, it told you GPU was not supported, time to fix it.
{./configure --enable-opencl --enable-scrypt} 
(if you did it right you should now get this: OpenCL...............: FOUND. GPU mining support enabled scrypt...............: Enabled ADL..................: SDK found, GPU monitoring support enabled)
*15. If everything has been good so far then
{make} 
*16. MATHEMATICAL! Now lets get it set up to run a test.
{nano test.sh} {!/bin/bash export DISPLAY=:0 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1} {./cgminer -n} 
*17. Now save by hitting [Control+x][y][Enter]
*18.Lastly lets CHmod test.sh
{chmod+x test.sh} 
*19. TIME TO RUN THE TEXT!!!
{./test.sh} 
(If your output looks like this your ready to go!!! CL Platform 0 vendor: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. CL Platform 0 name: AMD Accelerated Parallel Processing CL Platform 0 version: OpenCL 1.2 AMD-APP (1214.3) Platform 0 devices: 1 0 Tahiti GPU 0 AMD Radeon HD 7900 Series hardware monitoring enabled 1 GPU devices max detected)
*20. Excellent! Now we have it installed, its time to pick 2-3 pools, and get accounts set up at each of them. I currently use These 2, and If I find another I like I'll update. If you have a really awesome pool you would like me to include on the list, feel free to message me.
Pools: http://doge.cryptovalley.com/ (great community, server not super stable, but they have a chat. I hang out here a lot under the handle 'StrongBad' feel free to stop buy and ask questions)
https://dogehouse.org/ (Super stable pool, Great contests, super friendly, and they pay your miner a bonus if you find the block!)
Choose your pools, go to their sites and sign up. VERY IMPORTANT!!! Use different usernames and passwords for every mining site. If one site gets hacked, you don't want to give them a way to steal everything!!!!! Don't worry about the worker names and passwords being unique or complex tho, the most they can do with this is mine for you.
*21. Ok, now go to the CGminer folder, and open up a Terminal Window.
{sudo ./cgminer} 
This should start ./cgminer up with some really basic settings, and not pointed at any pool. Lets fix that: First press [p] to go to pool settings Now [A] and enter the information for the 1st pool. For instance if you are signing on for dogehouse: (Input server details: stratum+tcp://stratum.dogehouse.org:3333 Username: 'yourusername.workername password: 'yourpassword') If you got no errors, you did it right! Your miner should now connect and start to mine very slowly.
Now, do the same thing for all your other pools. the reason we do this is because Doge Coin pools are constantly being DDoS attacked, and this way your worker automatically switches over to a good pool if one go's down.
*22. time to save your current settings press [Enter] to get back out to the main menu, then [s] to bring up settings. Now press [W] to write a Config file. Name it DogeCoin.conf, and make sure to save it in the location it directs you too.
*23.OK! So, now we have everything set up to its basics. What you need to do now is sit down, and fine tune your Card(s). Its really early in the morning, and I need to get some sleep, I will add more on how to tune your card tomorrow in another post, and link it HERE:
Or, I will help you find the best configuration for your card(s). However as this is quite a bit of work, I do charge a small fee. Contact me with your card(s) information and I will get back to you right away. I generally let you decide how much to pay me.
This is my first ever guide on reddit! If you enjoyed it, or if it helped you please remember to upvote! I am going to start doing an educational YouTube series about Bitcoin, and will likely be doing a side program about Doge, if I find time and funding!! You can find that here: All tips are appreciated! DPTwcQreASwzt6TeWBWFb6Kz9ZU5Sezvr9 If you have any Questions, feel free to ask, I will get back to you ASAP.
Happy Digging everybody!
submitted by Sonofchange to Dogecoinmining [link] [comments]

[modpost] Possible wiki page, something I call "All about miners," covering things from basic terminology to miner config files and overclocking.

What is a miner?
A miner is a computer set up to solve cryptographic hashes in the litecoin network. Once a clump of these hashes, or a block, is mined, litecoins pop out! It's like opening a box of chocolates, except you know what you're gonna get :) Miners also handle transaction confirmations, making sure no single coin is double-spent.
Setting up your computer to be a miner
What kind of computer do I need?
Optimally, you'd have a good power supply and a couple decent Radeon/ATI/AMD graphics cards. Because of litecoin's hash algorithm, the gap between mining with graphics cards and processors is less than with most other cryptocurrencies, meaning that mining with some desktop processors may be worth it after electricity costs. Note that mining with laptops is not recommended because of the heat generated by mining, and mining with NVIDIA graphics cards may not be worth the cost.
How do I know if litecoin mining will be profitable for me?
First, check how fast you'll be mining with your hardware, how many litecoins you'll mine in a day, and how much litecoins are worth. Now, multiply the number of litecoins per day by their worth. Then, find out the power draw of your hardware, and calculate energy cost. Then finish by subtract energy cost from your daily earnings. If your number is positive, you're making that much money per day. If negative, you're losing money.
Keep in mind that the worth of litecoins goes up/down, and you have to earn the cost of your hardware before you churn a profit. Mining difficulty also goes up/down, depending on how many people are mining how fast in relation to how many litecoins are supposed to be generated how fast. See the economics(coming soon) post for more info.
Okay, I did all that. How do I start?
All you have to do is download a program and change some settings (later in the guide), and you're ready to go. If you're comfortable with configurations and the command line, Reaper and cgminer are your best friends. Otherwise, GUIMiner-scrypt is right for you. If you want to mine on your processor, download the "batteries included" miner via this link and setup should be relatively self-explanatory.
Do I mine alone?
Due to the difficulty of mining, we recommend that you mine with a pool where multiple people mine together. Visit your pool's about or help page for proper miner settings, which we're about to get to in-depth!
Under the hood
Configuring your miner (aka the hard part)
Before we get started, you should become familiar with these terms:
None of those will have any affect on how fast you mine. The settings that we'll be focusing on are:
If you're using GUIMiner-scrypt, there are default settings for different cards (lower right dropdown). I'm mining on a 7870. Here is what it looks like for me. You can follow along with the rest of this guide to optimize your settings. GUIMiner-scrypt is just a GUI to cgminer and reaper anyways.
If you are using a command-line miner, like reaper and cgminer, I recommend you download and isntall Notepad++ or SublimeText if on Linux.
Reaper is currently considered to be the best tool for mining. After you unzip your downloaded file, in the folder you'll find reaper.conf. It should look something like this:
kernel reaper.cl save_binaries yes enable_graceful_shutdown no long_polling yes platform 0 device 0 #mine bitcoin mine litecoin #mine solidcoin 
This will make it mine litecoin on your first graphics card and reference litecoin.conf, which for me looks like
host us-pool.give-me-ltc.com port 8080 user poolusername.1 pass anything protocol litecoin worksize 256 vectors 1 aggression 18 threads_per_gpu 1 sharethreads 32 lookup_gap 2 gpu_thread_concurrency 15380 
As you see, my thread concurrency is slightly different from the default of GUIMiner-scrypt. I found that this concurrency gives me the best hashrate!
NOTE: I do not use cgminer to mine litecoin. If you plan on using cgminer, which offers more hardware-controlling settings, in the cgminer folder you will want to create a text file. Then, open that text file w/ Notepad++ or SublimeText, then Save As > cgminer.con > file type > all. This will save the file with the proper name and as the proper type. Note that cgminer does not support high concurrencies. For me, cgminer.conf would look something like:
{ "pools" : [ { "url" : "XXX", "user" : "XXX", "pass" : "XXX" } ], "auto-fan" : true, "gpu-engine" : "920", "gpu-fan" : "0-100", "gpu-memclock" : "1375", "gpu-powertune" : "20", "gpu-vddc" : "1.219", "temp-cutoff" : "85", "temp-overheat" : "80", "temp-target" : "75", "temp-hysteresis" : "3", "kernel" : "scrypt", "gputhreads" : "1", "thread_concurrency": "8192", "worksize": "256", "intensity" : "dynamic", "vectors" : "1" } 
You saw some settings similar to what we saw in Reaper's litecoin.conf. The other settings have to do with my card's clocks, voltage, and fan. This is covered in the overclocking section right below!
Overclocking (aka the risky part)
Okay, first off I'm not responsible if you cause damage to your parts. Please research safe overclock settings for your card. Second, don't be afraid. Modern hardware has many safety features in place that help prevent mayhem like me...lol jk this isn't a car insurance add. For your better understanding, become familiar with these terms:
No one setting controls how effectively you mine; what matters most when it comes to clocks is the ratio between your core/memory clocks. Generally, a ratio of 0.7 or below is best. You will need to experiment. If you're using cgminer, you can control card settings from the conf file. However, if you aren't, I recommend using MSI Afterburner as your overclocking tool. You will need to unlock some settings. Using my cgminer settings, MSI Afterburner looks like this. I have found these settings to be the most stable while bringing me a high hashrate.
Other people's optimum settings
You can check the sidebar for the hardware comparison chart, but it is rarely updated and has huge sways in results. It is a good starting place. The mods of this subreddit will be putting together an updated, more accurate list in the near future.
END
I hope all things go smoothly for you and that you've learned a lot! Please consider donating LTC to
My wallet: LiD41gjLjT5JL2hfVz8X4SRm27T3wQqzjk
The writer of the [Consolidated Litecoin Mining Guide] which helped get me started
The writer of the [Absolute Beginner's Litecoin Mining Guide] which also helped me get started
submitted by mycomputerisbacon to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Don't mine bitcoins with an iMac!

I just got a new iMac at work (I'm a PC/linux guy, but my boss is a Mac guy). It has a ATI 6970, which is one of the best video cards for bitcoin mining today. So I figure I'll download Diablo miner and set it up. Apparently Open CL doesn't work very well on a Mac, so I was only mining at about 1/4 the rate that the 6970 would get in a PC, but still figured it would be worth it to run it over the weekend.
So I come back on Monday, and the computer is froze. I restart, and I'm getting visual artifacts on the screen, and it freezes, usually at the login screen, sometimes it logs in, only to have more video artifacts, and freezes shortly after. I'm pretty sure I fried the video card. . .
I load in safe mode, and delete everything related to bitcoin or the diablo miner, and call the company's tech guy complaining my New iMac is acting up, acting like I have no idea why it would do that.
TL;DR I fried my brand new (company) iMac by running bitcoin miner over the weekend.
submitted by bryanjjones to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

1st BTC/Altcoin Mining Guide, Feedback Welcome!

When I decided to write this guide, I was throwing cryptocurrencies around like they were nothing. I was foolish in the fact that I disregarded the exchange fees that are attached with the services that those exchanges provided. I'm in by no means a cryptocurrency genius, and I'm still not extremely seasoned at it, but I've learned enough about cryptocurrencies in the past month that I feel confident to pass on the knowledge I have learned and to help those who are overwhelmed on where to start.
So what exactly is a cryptocurrency? According to technopedia (n.d.) a Cryptocurrency is a type of digital currency that is based on cryptography. Cryptocurrency uses cryptography for security, making it difficult to counterfeit. Public and private keys are often used to transfer the currency from one person to another.
When mining cryptocurrencies, one important concept needs to be established, and that's hash rate. Hash rate is simply a unit of measurement of processing power. The more your hash rate is, the more profitable mining becomes.
This guide uses specific sites and software, chosen by myself, as a great springboard into the cryptocurrency world. These sites and software are extremely flexible, easy to use, and integrate very well together. The mining pools I've chosen are multiple currency pools, designed to consolidate a major of the cryptocurrencies together, and instead of using several mining pools, you use three.
These are the things you'll need to get started: MultiMiner
Accounts at Coinotron, The Mining Pool Co., and BitMinter
Accounts at Cryptsy and Coinbase
There are a few different ways to mine for cryptocurrencies, the common of which are using your Central Processing Unit (CPU), Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), and Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) devices. CPU based mining is not profitable any longer, and will cost you money in the end by increasing electricity costs. GPU based mining is still popular, but losing steam against ASIC based mining. If you choose to use your GPU for mining, AMD/ATI based graphics cards (especially the Radeon HD 79xx series of cards), are the most efficient. If you have an nVidia based graphics card, I'm sorry. You can still mine on nVidia cards, but your hash rates are going to be much slower when compared to their AMD/ATI counterparts. If you chose to use GPU mining, Black Friday or Cyber Monday are you best bets for upgrading your equipment. ASIC based mining is quickly losing value with the changing difficulty on all networks, but it's the most cost effective way to increase your hash rate, and see a positive return on any equipment purchases. If my math is correct, using the methods in this guide, in order for any ASIC device to yield a positive cash flow, you've got to get a device that has at least a 5Gh/s rate (such as the Butterfly Labs Jalapeno).
Now for the fun part, explaining how everything in this well greased machine is going to work. Patience plays a big part in the cryptocurrency world, and when I first started, I had none. I was so eager to see the amount of Bitcoin go up, regardless of how much I was getting penalized in fees from trading. So, that's the first step on your journey. PATIENCE. I CANNOT emphasize this enough. Sometimes, you've just got to hurry up and wait, the effects of waiting things out on the cryptocurrency market WILL PAY OFF.
Step one of this machine is signing up for all three pools (BitMinter, Coinotron, and Mining Pool Co.). This is so that you can actually get server addresses to plug into MultiMiner, after signing up for these services though, you've still got a ways to go.
Step two is sign up for Cryptsy. I chose Cryptsy because of the features they're going to offer at a later time, as well as support for 60 cryptocurrencies (which covers all but one of which we can mine). When your Cryptsy account is setup, you will need to go into the Balances portion of Cryptsy, and find all of the currencies in which you will be mining from the pools. Once Balances are loaded up, you will need to click on the Actions button next to the currency, and click Deposit / Autosell, and then Generate Address. There's a small clipboard near the address it generated, and that will copy the address for pasting in the mining pool websites. You will want to copy, and paste all of them to a text document, along with which currency it belongs to. Not only does this keep you from juggling back and forth trying to figure out things, but it helps for reference and setting up MultiMiner.
Once you have those accounts setup, you'll want to sign up for Coinbase. A WORD OF WARNING FOR THOSE WHO ARE PARANOID... Coinbase will want to link to a bank account, this is mandatory if you want to trade your currencies for cash. If you want to trade currencies, just for the sake of trading, then you can skip Coinbase altogether. You can transfer your Bitcoins from Cryptsy straight into Coinbase, and then sell the Bitcoins from Coinbase, and straight into your designated bank account.
MultiMiner, oh how amazing you are. For every cryptocurrency available in all pools, you will need to add these coins, along with server addresses, log-ins and passwords. To do so, click on the drop down next to the Settings button, and click Coins. From there, click on Add Coin, and choose each coin from a pool. This will list it in the box to the left, and give you the ability to add information on the right. You can add multiple servers as well, in case the current server you're mining on goes down. After all your coins are setup, you'll need to setup your Strategies. Click the drop down next to Settings, and chose Strategies. Check the Enable Strategies check box, choosing Straight Profitability from the drop down, and checking the Strategy every five minutes (that way you're not losing money by mining something that has dropped in price). This aggressive price checking makes it to where you're always on top with whatever you're mining. Also make sure you have Mine the Single Most Profitable Coin selected. Stick with CoinChoose as your price source (under Settings), as CoinWarz charges for there services beyond a certain point. Click Start, and take a vacation.
Reading the charts on Cryptsy can be a little tricky, and scary if you've never saw those types of graphs before. Those graphs are called Candlestick Charts, and are used primarily in the stock market. I won't go in to great detail on this, however, you can find a nice cheat sheet on the subject here.
I hope everyone enjoyed the guide, sorry for being punctual and brief, but there isn't anything too elaborate of complicated about searching for cryptocurrencies. I love mining as a hobby, mining's fun, and if there is any money to be made off of mining from my end, great, if not, I had fun mining.
While compiling a spreadsheet of the minable currencies in this guide, if everything is set up correctly (and assuming servers aren't down), you should be able to mine the following:
And while Mining Pool Co. offers ASICcoin and Unobtainium, ASICcoin isn't supported in MultiMiner, and Unobtanium isn't supported in Cryptsy. I still mine for Unobtanium in hopes that Cryptsy will include it one day.
References
Cryptocurrency. (n.d.). In technopedia. Retrieved from http://www.technopedia.com/
submitted by ford0415 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

CGMiner : [All devices disabled, cannot mine!]

Hey guys,
I am a Bitcoin newbie. I am just starting out to do BTC mining. I looked up some online resources and wanted to try out mining. So I got CGMiner as everybody said that was one of the best miners out there. But I always keep getting the following error message :
[2013-05-01 16:52:03] All devices disabled, cannot mine!
I am running Arch linux on a dual core intel machine. I have a ATI Radeon graphics card. Following from lspci :
VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD] nee ATI RV516 [Radeon X1300/X1550 Series]
And I have the a driver installed for the GPU as well :
ttm 64499 1 radeon
Could somebody explain what is going on and what I need to do in order to fix it? This is the first time I am running any miner and all I did was just say cgminer on the command line.
Edit : Edited for clarity
submitted by hRob to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Private local pool with twelve ~10 year old computers (x-post from Bitcoin)

So, a quick background. I work for an after school non-profit. I'm the network administratotech person/miracle workeetc. I maintain the "network" and all of it's computers.
Since it's a non-profit and I'm still in school, I'm ridiculously underpaid, but it's a good company and they're flexible. However, I've had this recent idea to try making the industry minimum by using all of these "computer lab" PCs for bitcoin mining.
All of them (with the exception of two in the library) are about 5 to 10 years old. I have room for about 17 computers in this lab (possibly 20) and due to some law of the universe where elementary, middle school, and high school age kids somehow manage to break computers just by being near them, I have about 12 working. When I first got the job, most/all of them were full of malware and spyware, some running unlicensed copies of XP Pro so I have Ubuntu 10.04 on them. I'll be in the process of upgrading them over this week and next week.
The majority of the computers are these donated HP desktops that are dual-core P4s @ 2.5 GHz. The video cards are GeForce MX 440s (8x AGP). About four are Dell Optiplexes: single core P4s at 2.5 GHz with ATI Rage 128 Pros. The two library computers have integrated Intel GPUs and Pentium dual-core E200s.
Since I doubt I can do GPU mining, I was thinking about CPU mining. One core throughout the day from 11am - 8pm and from 8pm to 11am, these computers are working as hard as they can. I can write a few scripts and set up cron to do this for me. I was reading up on MMP (Multiminer Protocol) and have a computer in the "office" I can use as a server, then all the computers could run ufasoft and talk to the MMP server via JSON RPC unless there's a CPU miner that speaks MMP.
Has anyone done anything like this before? Does anyone have any advice? Is there a better way to do this? I spent most of yesterday reading up on bitcoin, bitcoin mining, etc. Still learning so if something I said doesn't add up, that's why.
P.S. Posting this year since I haven't gotten any attention from /Bitcoin.
tl;dr: what's the best way to set up a private pool of 12 average-end desktops in a LAN for cpu mining?
submitted by BinaryMn to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[Weekly Spotlight] This week's updates, rig pics, and misc links!

Welcome to the first ever Weekly spotlight!

Hello fellow miners! We're opening up a segment we call the Weekly Spotlight, where we pool together some key topics. All of our sources will be linked :)
Because this is the first spotlight segment, we'll go over more than what's been happening in the past week. We'll be covering things since the beginning of time. Let's get started.

New wiki entries!

Our wiki is linked in the sidebar, and is under constant development. We've got 6 pages so far, so I'll go ahead and just Copy + Paste the Table of Contents (pages and sub-pages).
(1) INDEX
(2) BUILD-A-RIG
(3) GETTING YOUR MINER UP AND RUNNING
CGMINER (IN-DEPTH)
OVERCLOCKING (IN-DEPTH)
(4) ALL ABOUT POOLS
As always, if you have any suggestions, or want to contribute, message the mods!

We have a new tagging system!

For the mods!
  • [MOD POST] Greenifies title text. Used for general announcements.
  • [NEW RULE] Orangifies title text. Used for announcing a new rule.
  • [Weekly Spotlight] Yellowifies title text. Used to draw attention to the spotlight!
For everyone!
  • [Guide] Bright-purpleifies title text. Used for bringing attention to your guide.
  • [Pool Launched] Tuquoises title text. Used to promote your pool.
Keep in mind that (to my knowledge) it's only possible to tag posts via targetting the href, so it's best that you tag a self post. If you need to link to your guide, do so from there.

We have an IRC channel!

You can see it towards the bottom of the sidebar.
Gathering from the times I've been in the room, it's pretty active. Chilling and live Q&A. Come pop in sometime!

Difficulty up from ~90 to ~480 since the creation of this sub!

Sorry guys.
But hey, there's a bright side! Litecoin's value has rocketed to 6x the amount, so your profitability in $$$ should be slightly higher than before. Also, according to litecoinpool.org, the next difficulty adjustment should bring difficulty down about 80 points. According to dustcoin.com, litecoin mining is at 130% profitability compared to bitcoin mining.

Now for entertainment, rig pics!

We have a couple...interesting...cooling solutions.
  • Posted by ImplyingImplicati0ns. A rig cooling solution posted on the IRC! [link]
  • Posted by 1930197. It's called an in-line duct fan. [link]
We have one milk crate pic.
  • Posted by Shwizy. It nets 5 Mh/s. [link]
And a whole bunch of custom frames and other solutions.
  • Posted by technocoma. 10 GPUs in a sweet setup. [link]
  • Posted by Litecoin_Messiah. 7 7950s with room to expand. [link]
  • Posted by That111Dude. 4 7950s and a box fan! [link]
  • Posted by fudgebucket27. 2 GPUs on slide-out trays. [link]

Other links!

  • Furuknap is crowdfunding a mining guide book. He's active here and has written guides for us before. [link]
  • LeStraw made a GUI frontent to reaper. It's pretty cool! [link]
  • rzw wrote a keepalive script for your crashy CPU miner! [link]
  • meeh420 made a miner status Android app! [link]
submitted by mycomputerisbacon to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Eobot.com FAQ

FAQ https://www.eobot.com/new.aspx?referid=94984
General Questions What is a Bitcoin? Good question; see www.bitcoin.org for more information.
What are your options to withdraw? We currently only allow withdrawals in BTC/LTC/BC/NMC/DOGE/XRP/DRK/RDD/BTS/CURE/PPC/NXT/SYS.
Why can't I deposit or withdraw "real currency", aka fiat (USD/EUJPY/GBP/CNY/RUB/etc.)? Due to international law, we do not allow you to deposit or withdraw fiat currencies. In the USA, there are MSB and FinCen regulations; in Europe, certain countries have banned cryptocurrencies, and in China, the banks aren't allowed to transfer cryptocurrencies. The laws may change in the future.
Why does my "Total Cryptocurrency Value" go down? This is because that display is tied to the exchange rates on other websites. Also see this user generated YouTube video for more information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GucqlMuIXMg
Are their any fees to join or monthly fees? No fees.
Do you speak Spanish/Russian/Chinese? No, only English, but Google Translator works well.
What are the maximums/minimums for withdrawing? There are no maximums. The minimums are small, see the withdraw page for details.
Where can I see the terms and conditions? Please click here for terms and conditions.
Where can I see the privacy policy? Please click here for privacy policy.
Are you hiring? We are always looking for quality talent. If you would like to contribute, then please send your cover letter and resume to [email protected].
Do you have a bug bounty program? Yes, we pay for bugs, so contact us for details or visit us at CrowdCurity.com and submit bugs there!
Do you perform off-chain transactions? No we do not. All cryptocurrencies are sent, usually including miner fees, and can be seen on the blockchain for that respective cryptocurrency. This helps secure the network, makes our transactions transparent, provides an easier way to debug and track down coins, and reduces the chance for fraud. An off-chain transaction would be like what Coinbase could do if both users are Coinbase users and they change coins from one email to another, mark it in the database, and Bitcoin is never actually sent from one wallet to another.
Why does my balance reset after refreshing the page or changing cryptocurrencies? The server updates every 60 seconds and the balances you see updating in real-time are performed with Javascript. If you change pages quickly, or choose a new cryptocurrency, then it will look like it is resetting. However nothign is lost, as whatever cryptocurrency it is set at when the server updates will get the past 60 seconds of mining results.
Help! My account was hacked and withdraws are being made? Eobot is a secure site and has never been compromised. If your account was hacked, then you should change your password, turn on 2FA, and turn on email notifications. There are many unscrupulous Bitcoin sites, and most likely, you used the same password on another site. Never re-use passwords!
Do you have any wallpapers? Yes, you can download wallpaper1 or wallpaper2. Feel free to send us your own creations.
What does Eobot stand for? We have heard everything, let us know your favorite, including: Earn Online Bot, Earn Online Bitcoins Online Tool, Earn Online By Our Tech.
Is this legal? We cannot provide legal advice; make sure cryptocurrencies are legal in your jurisdiction before continuing to use Eobot.
Cloud Mining Questions What are the Cloud Mining fees? For electricity and maintenance, we currently charge a fee of 65% for SHA-256 and 65% for Scrypt. These values will change as difficulty increases, exchange rates change, and newer ASICs come online. These fees are better than our competitors, for instance CEX.IO charges $0.105 per GHS, which is a 81% fee! While GAW charges a 96% fee at current prices!
How long are the Cloud Mining rentals and contracts? Prior to October 11 2014, GHS/KHS contracts had no expiration. Old contracts are not affected. New contracts and rentals, mined or purchased after October 11 2014, are now limited in term for 5 years going forward. See your History tab for expiration dates.
Can I sell my Cloud Mining? No, you cannot sell the cloud shares at this time. This is because we own the hardware and do not want to be stuck if everyone decides to sell at once.
Can I buy Cloud Mining with credit card/USD? Yes, but please keep in mind you cannot sell or convert the Cloud Mining.
Can I buy Cloud Mining with cryptocurrency? Yes, deposit the cryptocurrency and then convert it to your choice of Cloud Mining.
What are the maximums/minimums when making a credit card purchase to buy Cloud Mining? The minimum is 1.0 GHS and 10.0 KHS and there is no maximum at this time.
Can I buy a Cloud Mining that mines in Scrypt? You can use the Cloud Mining SHA-256 hashing power to mine other currencies by automatically converting them as you mine, but the earnings will still be tied to SHA-256/Bitcoin difficulty, not Scrypt/Litecoin difficulty.
What is the difference between Cloud Mining SHA-256 and Cloud Mining Scrypt? One is tied to the difficulty in mining SHA-256 cryptocurrency (Bitcoin) and the other is tied to the difficulty in mining Scrypt cryptocurrency (Litecoin). This means that if history is any indication of the future, then the Cloud Mining Scrypt won't decrease as fast as the Cloud Mining SHA-256.
What does 1 instance of Cloud Mining SHA-256 and Cloud Mining Scrypt equal? 1 of Cloud SHA-256 equates to 1.0 GHS of SHA-256 mining power, while 1 of Cloud Scrypt equates to 1 KHS of Scrypt mining power.
Can I change the pool that my Cloud mines on? No, you cannot; this may change in the future.
What hardware is behind the Cloud Mining? The hardware varies from custom ASICs to GPUs. The ASICs are behind the SHA-256 and the GPUs are behind the Scrypt.
Can I RDP (remote desktop) into my Cloud Mining? No, you cannot at this time; we will run the servers for you.
What is the Cloud Mining Pre-Order? These are the same as the other Cloud Mining, but they will start mining on a later date. For instance, a Cloud Mining Pre-Order October 2014 will start mining on October 1, 2014.
Software/Miner Questions Why is it stuck on "initializing...please wait 5 minutes"? We recently changed our Scrypt pool, so this messge will show and the stats and speed won't show under your account. See pool info page for more info.
Why does it show as a trojan/virus? This is a false-positive that many of the popular antivirus programs report. For now you can ignore it, or try another free antivirus, like Microsoft Security Essentials. Hackers use something similar programs to make money off of people's computers, so that is why it shows up as a virus.
Why does Chrome block the download as malicious? This is another false-positive. Simply, go to your Chrome settings, scroll to the bottom and click on "Show Advanced Settings". Go to the Privacy section and uncheck "Enable phishing and malware protection". You will only do this temporarily. Then proceed to download our software. Then return to your privacy settings and recheck Enable Phishing to further protect you.
Do you have a Mac or Linux version? Yes, see the Pool Info under the Account page.
How do I use cgminer? See this English PDF tutorial for cgminer, or Spanish version, created by one of our members, for a simple walk-through.
How can I increase the speed? Important to increase speed: The default cgminer settings do not include hardware specific flags, which you may find here in the Litecoin Mining Hardware Comparison. Failing to use the proper flags can result in performance decreases in excess of 50%.
What do the intensity settings relate to? This is the same as cgminer flag --intensity. Low is 11, normal is none, high is 15, very high is 17, extreme is 19.
Can I use one account for multiple computers on same IP address? Yes, it will add your speed/rates together, you can use as many computers as you want.
Can I connect to the pool manually, through cgminer or bfgminer? Yes, see the Pool Info under the Account page.
Do you use Bitcoin and Litecoin? Yes, we are the easiest miner to use with BTC and LTC and convert on the backend automatically.
What do you use on the backend? We use cgminer, bfgminer, pooler's CPU miner, and a variety of pools.
Can I mine any cryptocurrency? Yes, regardless if you use SHA-256 or Scrypt (BTC vs LTC mode), you can earn and mine any cryptocurrency.
Can I use an ASIC? Yes, simply choose the option and run as GPU mode. Devices that work with bfgminer will work, for instance USB Block Eruptors or Butterfly Labs ASICs. You can also contact us for pool information for other ASICs.
What is the best graphics card/computer to buy? Either use a high end ATI Radeon card, or buy one of the USB Block Eruptor devices on Ebay/Amazon or a similar online store.
What drivers do I need for USB mode? http://www.silabs.com/products/mcu/Pages/USBtoUARTBridgeVCPDrivers.aspx
Why doesn't GPU mode work? You may need to download the OpenCL drivers; get them from here: http://developer.nvidia.com/opencl
Where can I get the .NET framework? Try Windows Update, or use Microsoft Web Platform Installer.
Can I use a proxy server? Yes, edit intensity.txt and put the details in there, for example, add "--proxy=http://mycompany-http-proxy:8080"
Where can I download the software? Download from link here
Can I use custom flags/change intensity? Yes, you can put in whatever custom flags/parameters/arguments you want. Edit the "resources/intensity.txt" file. Put in whatever you want, like for GPU mode: "--intensity 12 --shaders 1024" or for CPU mode (number of threads): "-t 32"
submitted by KryptosBit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Private local pool with twelve ~10 year old computers

So, a quick background. I work for an after school non-profit. I'm the network administratotech person/miracle workeetc. I maintain the "network" and all of it's computers.
Since it's a non-profit and I'm still in school, I'm ridiculously underpaid, but it's a good company and they're flexible. However, I've had this recent idea to try making the industry minimum by using all of these "computer lab" PCs for bitcoin mining.
All of them (with the exception of two in the library) are about 5 to 10 years old. I have room for about 17 computers in this lab (possibly 20) and due to some law of the universe where elementary, middle school, and high school age kids somehow manage to break computers just by being near them, I have about 12 working. When I first got the job, most/all of them were full of malware and spyware, some running unlicensed copies of XP Pro so I have Ubuntu 10.04 on them. I'll be in the process of upgrading them over this week and next week.
The majority of the computers are these donated HP desktops that are dual-core P4s @ 2.5 GHz. The video cards are GeForce MX 440s (8x AGP). About four are Dell Optiplexes: single core P4s at 2.5 GHz with ATI Rage 128 Pros. The two library computers have integrated Intel GPUs and Pentium dual-core E200s.
Since I doubt I can do GPU mining, I was thinking about CPU mining. One core throughout the day from 11am - 8pm and from 8pm to 11am, these computers are working as hard as they can. I can write a few scripts and set up cron to do this for me. I was reading up on MMP (Multiminer Protocol) and have a computer in the "office" I can use as a server, then all the computers could run ufasoft and talk to the MMP server via JSON RPC unless there's a CPU miner that speaks MMP.
Has anyone done anything like this before? Does anyone have any advice? Is there a better way to do this? I spent most of yesterday reading up on bitcoin, bitcoin mining, etc. Still learning so if something I said doesn't add up, that's why.
tl;dr: what's the best way to set up a private pool of 12 average-end desktops in a LAN for cpu mining?
submitted by BinaryMn to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Best Bitcoin Miner Machine Free download ️ Best BTC Miners ... Best Bitcoin Mining Rigs in 2020  New 110 TH/s Antminer ... Best Bitcoin Mining Site  Without Investment  Payment ... Best Bitcoin Mining/Miner Software - YouTube By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 ...

Best für Cloud Mining: Miner-Server. Wenn Sie sich für den Einstieg in den Bitcoin-Mining entschieden haben, aber noch nicht bereit sind, in teure ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit)-Miner zu investieren, können Sie sich für einen Cloud-basierten Mining-Service entscheiden. Top 5 Best Bitcoin Miners The Dragonmint T16. Image by halongmining.com. The Dragonmint T16 is one of the most impressive mining rigs today. The Halong Mining ASIC miner was made available for shipment in March 2018. The mining hardware is efficient in terms of energy consumption and overall effectiveness. Dragonmint T16 is user-friendly and comes with a comprehensible and easy to follow ... Best Bitcoin Mining Software Reviewed. By: Ofir Beigel Last updated: 8/23/20 If you’re thinking of getting into Bitcoin mining, one of the things you’re going to need is a software to run your mining hardware.In this post I’ll review the top Bitcoin mining software available on the market. This will help you determine the best bitcoin miner hardware and start mining bitcons yourself. Our Top 7 Best ASIC Miners 2020. 1. Bitmain Antminer S5. The Antminer S5 may not be the latest Bitcoin mining hardware (other models like the S7 and S9, have come after it), but it is still in use, and its efficiency and function is exemplary. The Bitmain Antminer S5 features a power supply labeled ... Best Bitcoin Mixers - Top Bitcoin Tumblers 2020 - Reviews & Rating Table of Contents. 1 Best Bitcoin Mixers - Top Bitcoin Tumblers 2020 - Reviews & Rating . 1.1 Top BTC Tumbling Services - User Rating - September 2020. 1.1.1 Ranking - September 2020. 1.1.1.1 1# BitcoinMixer; 1.1.1.2 2 ...

[index] [7854] [28003] [51490] [13056] [30905] [11650] [42983] [24327] [40378] [30103]

Best Bitcoin Miner Machine Free download ️ Best BTC Miners ...

GPU bitcoin mining rig ATI Radeon 5850 x 4 bitcoin miner. #bitcoin #bitcoinmining #bitcoinminingsoftware By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 (Profitable). This is a review on the most profitable, easy, a... Free Download Crypto Mining Bot: Link 1: https://nippyshare.com/v/c0ec50 Link 2: https://mega.nz/file/18ohGKLS#ZRmH1C5197l7fx8_Yuv-YJKCb220SZkPEC2-PaGRYcI Be... In this video I will review for the best Bitcoin mining software for you. Let's observe this guy's!!! Downloaded https://bit.ly/2S9tFJ0 Please support my cha... I'm going to talking about top free best bitcoin mining website, and I'm gonna tell you every steps to get bitcoin mining! In this video I'm showing how to m...

#